Hour of Code Event Training

Want to help introduce programming to millions of students? Be part of the largest learning event in the world by leading a group of students through an introductory Hour of Code™ learning experience provided by Microsoft. This course prepares you to do just that, providing you with presentation materials, a script, and train-the-trainer guidance to be ready to lead your own group of students through their first Hour of Code™.

The Hour of Code™ is a nationwide initiative by Computer Science Education Week and Code.org to introduce millions of students to one hour of computer science and computer programming, during Computer Science Education Week, December 8–14, 2014. Microsoft is proud to be a lead supporter of this global movement, which helps students discover the fun of coding.

Course Outline:

  • Overview
  • Why Should You Participate
  • Event Prerequisites
  • Event Timeline and Script: Road to Code Tutorial
  • Backup Timeline and Script
  • How to Keep a Classroom of Students Engaged
  • FAQ
Instructor Team
Brian Swan | Microsoft Senior Program Manager | @brian_swan
Brian Swan is an Academic Content PM in the Learning Experiences group and is responsible for Developer content in IT Academy. Brian taught math and computer science at the high-school level for 14 years before changing careers in 2006. Since then, he has held roles as a Support Engineer, Programmer-Writer, and Program Manager.
Scott Burmester | Microsoft Student Partner Worldwide Program Lead | @BurmesterScott
Scott Burmester is the Worldwide Program Lead for the Microsoft Student Partner program, and he leads student developer field events. Before coming to the Developer Experience group, he worked in the Worldwide Public Sector Education business, managing the Education Network. His career at Microsoft has spanned 20 years.
Live Event Details
November 17, 2014
8–9am, 4–5pm PST
What: Recorded session with live Q&A
Cost: Free
Audience: Anyone who wants to lead an Hour of Code event!
Prerequisites:

An interest in teaching young students how to code